Sunday, 24 April 2016



sepehr

39 comments:

  1. What do you think about this old man, old man?

    http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/charles-eugster-fittest-oap-on-planet

    He's older than you and way older than me but he's probably in way better shape than both of us.

    Well I guess it depends on genetics maybe and circumstances growing up which hinder us and/or allow certain benefits to flourish.

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  2. how do you protect yourself from the sun ?

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    1. i don't like the chemicals, just use clothing eg long sleeved shirts and hats

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  3. yes i get tired of people sometimes

    but that shit never ends, like everything else

    so fuck it

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    1. yeah something like that ! :o (

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  4. the thing is you and jason enjoy reading that stuff

    i don't

    well i do too i guess but i can't be arsed to do that most of the time

    it's not something i seek

    if you link something or if he links something then that's the only time i'd read something of that sort



    i told you, i'm just a regular retard

    you just don't listen

    i don't think i want to change, if it's even possible

    it seems you have to want to read or do certain things

    there's no cultivation of any sort

    no cultivating enjoyment of higher work

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    1. really this board is just if you have a question about something or something interesting to convey

      i actually resent having to put the time into replying to your not well thought out post

      hubric and self indulgent, please feel free to leave !

      people just thoughtlessly take my time from me . .

      " i'm just a regular retard "

      yeah there's a million billion of you, all rubbing my nose in their shit like i am of no account and there for their purposes . .

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    2. K sorry for wasting your time

      Don't reply to this

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    3. Your answer to my bullshit cut to the core, all escape routes blocked.

      I tried to point fingers but it all seemed for naught.


      I didn't mean to rhyme, it just came out like that.

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  5. I remember being blown away by Diary of a Madman when I read it when I was younger. I should revisit it.

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  6. Are you referring to Lu Xun's or Gogol's Diary of a Madman? I was referring to Lu Xun's short story... Just want to verify. I've never read Gogol.

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  7. He's probably talking about Gogol because Jason was talking about him too

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  8. You need to quit being so capricious with your opinions. Was the play good or bad? Quit changing your mind constantly.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Also, I edited it a lot. I mean Act I is stylistically better now. Act II is very good though, as you've said.

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    3. i really don't want to get involved further with your play, its not my business as to whether its good or bad and that's not really a judgement i would make anyway

      its peripheral to the purpose of this blog, a way of looking at it is al-marri is interesting and mani is not

      http://www.humanistictexts.org/al_ma'arri.htm

      if there was endless time we could go back and forth on this sort of thing forever, but as it is i am really pressed for time and i would suggest you find your own audience . . .

      you are lucky, i think you edit and revise well, but really there will be people out there interested in it, there are people on the web interested in mani and manichaeism . .

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    4. I was the one that recommended Al Ma'arri to you originally. Wtf.

      Your brain is becoming messed up. My play isn't about Mani or Manichaeism. You missed its point. It's a deconstruction of good and evil and also Nietzschean affirmation. I'm showing there's an indeterminacy between affirmation and negation in the Nietzschean sense.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nietzschean_affirmation

      I don't care about Manichaeism or Zoroastrianism. What I am showing is the Indo-European conception of good and evil has a genealogical root in Ancient Persia. The idea of light being synonymous with goodness and darkness with evil. I am deconstructing such duality while at the same time also challenging Nietzschean affirmation.

      The reason I was being historically accurate in Act I is to show that there is a continuum of Western civilization and Christianity with the Persian idea of "truth" and progress:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppjg4Q-mCZg&feature=youtu.be

      Watch that video. The whole idea of a "truth" and of "betterment" came from such a time period or whatnot. I am deconstructing it. The Mani, Zoroastrianism, and Manichaeism was just a means to do that.

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    5. i don't actually disagree with nietzschean affirmation

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWRfrnf4VZg

      i would go further and say that's what 7th patriarch zen is about and there are if not many, at least some multitude of such moments or transitions in identity in life !

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    6. My play doesn't disagree with Nietzschean affirmation either, but it takes a more Derridean approach towards it. Read the Wiki article in full. I like how Derrida approaches Nietzchean affirmation.

      The final scene is supposed to be metaphorical for what Derrida is saying in regards to Nietzschean affirmation:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nietzschean_affirmation#Derridean_interpretation

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    7. i think what derrida does is explode the communal objectivist viewpoint that philosophy tries to drive to, its a process rather than an action so there's always that undercurrent with him

      i have written about that here, i say its part of a continuum, whether one gets to a semantically correct solipsism is a different matter !

      http://mueller_ranges.tripod.com/andrew/pending_poems141.html#continuum

      so this is basically the tension and play of philosophy and religion, the metamorphosis of communal objectivism into semantically correct solipsism which you can also call 7th patriarch zen !

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    8. That's what my play does. It's a breakdown of commmunal objectivism (or intersubjectivity and ethos) into the solipsism.

      I think there is no ethos out there that is impervious to being subverted and upended, but there is something about a solipsistic realization that cannot be taken away. When Mani (in my play) awoke to the stupidity of religion and the communal paradigm, he understood something Kartir could not take away, but the same is not true when he was into the communal way of things. Of course, my play is fiction and loosely based on historical facts.

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    9. the most successful plays in my view are sir henry nevilleʼs twelfth night, chekhovʼs uncle vanya, satreʼs huis clos and beckettʼs waiting for godot

      they are all based in fictional contexts, your use of a literal historical context and creating what doesnʼt match what can be inferred of the character of mani historically makes for a discordance in the play that dooms it !

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    12. Sir Henry Neville's Macbeth is very good and is loosely based on history. My play can be interpreted that way.

      Also, I did have a ulterior motive with Act I: I want more people to become aware of Ancient Persian mythology and history. It is being "lost" and rarely mentioned, even though it is a part of the Indo-European tradition. That's not the main focus of my play, but I did want to convey the atmosphere of that in order to dispel the misconceptions films like 300 and Prince of Persia create. My play is fictional, but at the same time I want to get the regal ATMOSPHERE of that time period and place down in order to deconstruct its communal paradigm into solipsistic.

      I found Mani and Kartir's opposition towards each other interesting because Mani derives his "deontological ethics" from a transcendent force whereas Kartir's bases his "virtue ethics" on the community, you could call it "biopolitical" in some sense. I show how both are insufficient.

      So you get me, the five themes my play dealt with are these:

      1) Derridean interpretation of Nietzschean affirmation: the breakdown of communal paradigm to solipsism

      2) The insufficiency of crystalline ethical structures. Neither Mani nor Kartir understood meaning is a fluid. It was only after Mani came to terms with his solitude that he came to apprehend how meaning is a fluid at the end, Infinity.

      3) How process is fundamental, not essence.

      4) The recursion of real and unreal & meaning and meaninglessness involved in enlightenment -- their quasi-border too.

      5) I wanted to convey Persian culture and such. A lot of people can't tell it apart from Arabic culture.

      MY next play will be more like Sartre's Huis Clos, which I've recently read, or Beckett's Waiting for Godot. I'm not limiting myself to one style.

      I bought Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky's translation of Gogol. They're the best translators of Russian literature for your information.

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    13. sir henry neville said that plays should be entertaining as well as instructive, which is something to bear in mind and any play needs strong female roles to keep the other half of the audience interested !

      don't write dry as dust philosophical plays that stay on a shelf, people should want to see them because they entertain !

      plays should be seen and not read and that means expense and the only way to cover the expense is for them to be interesting to a wide range of people which is pretty much what goethe said on the subject !

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    14. The first Act of my play is very funny. I had other people read it, and they thought it was funny and entertaining. I added humor to help with the pace.

      I'm pretty much done with the play. I spent so much time on it, I'm tired. I want to focus on my children's picture book now. Solitude in natural scenery will help with it.

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  9. What is your favorite children's picture book?

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    1. maxfield parrish is my favourite artist and for stories, and poems, lewis carroll/charles dodgson

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    2. I mean, do you like any children book artists (e.g., Jerry Pinkney or Lisa McCue)?

      Also, Russian lacquer art is very beautiful. Their style is very similar to Persian miniatures.

      I think Mahmoud Farshchian is my favorite artist though.

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    3. jerry pinkney is the best of that list !

      http://www.readingrockets.org/books/interviews/pinkneyj

      sepehr i know you think i am an idiot but maxfield parrish did children's book illustrations and is the best i have seen !

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    4. I'm having trouble finding Maxfield Parrish's children books... Do you have any of the books he illustrated to recommend? I like what I see.

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    5. do a google image search, you can see the paintings that obviously are done for children's stories !

      i think he only illustrated and didn't write the stories

      he's very well known and there is heaps of info about him on the web !

      an idea might be to take a painting of his, eg daybreak and write a sort of wang wei "peach blossom" story around it, children stumbling into "peach blossom/daybreak world" their adventures then then losing their way and that world, coming back to their own time and space and the memory gently fading becoming more unreal as their lives progress


      you can stick anything you like in that world, mani, kibir, al-marri, the thing is you have it on the visual background of the paintings

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    6. What you described reminds me of David Wiesner's style, especially Mr. Wuffles and Free Fall. I think you would like him greatly. Check him out.

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    7. yeah, you're actually starting to sound commercial ! : o)

      what you want is a story script and an animation studio and funding !

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    8. http://animationresources.org/illustration-maxfield-parrishs-arabian-nights-1909-2/

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  10. was your dia kensho experiences sudden ? were you praying ? what led to them ?

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    1. they're just something that happens, you may not even work out they are significant until decades later !


      they're actually a bit stressful, i think i prefer life without them but they are also beauty and truth and in a celibate life, that's all there is !

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